"Sometimes I feel like the city is sucking away at my soul."
The Doom Generation (1995), Directed by Gregg Araki. 

Atsushi Takenouchi, Margose Festival Espace Aimé Cesaire - Studios Decanis Marseille, 2008.

Eseohe Arhebamen performing Fire Butoh 3, Seoul 2008. Photographed by Kwon Young-il.

Alice di Lauro, Street Performance in Pontedera, 2013.

Alice di Lauro, Performance at Vicopisano’s Prison, 2013.

Atsushi Takenouchi performing Butoh in Enclosure, Red Earth Hambledon Hill, United Kingdom, 2007.

Derek Jarman, The Angelic Conversation, 1985.

Derek Jarman, Edward II, 1991.

Derek Jarman, Caravaggio, 1986.

Bains rituels, 2009. Photographed by http://picspics.fr.

They are named Erzulie, Cousin Zaka, Ogoun Feray. They are the lwas in Creole language, the voodoo pantheon of spirits. They are bridges between humans and the Bondye, the Supreme Being viewed as inaccessible by Voodoo believers. Every July, thousands of Haitians take good luck baths in Saut d’Eau. There, catholics give thanks to the Virgin Mary. Voodoo believers bath in a fall to worship Erzulie, the voodoo spirit of love and motherly protector. Some enter into a trance. Candles are placed between the roots of huge trees honored as resting places of the lwas. In Plaine du Nord, Northern Haiti, catholic pilgrims celebrate Saint-Jacques-The Saviour and Voodoo believers Papa Ogoun Feray, the lwa of war. Founding spirit of the revolt of the slaves, Papa Ogoun Feray is praised for its power to fight poverty. His followers take mud baths in the Pool Saint-Jacques and kill in sacrifice red roosters and black bulls. With the faith renewed, they end their pilgrimage to the seaside city of Lemonade and purify their soul and body in the Atlantic waters.

Theo, docteur et prêtre vaudou, 2008-2009. Photographed by http://picspics.fr.

Hougan Theo is both a doctor and a voodoo priest. Since the age of 14, he cures natural diseases and also the ones he calls mystical diseases. He is over 70. His reputation extends far beyond the area. He lives in a simply way but has money and lands. He cultivates medicinal plants and also rice for selling. A discharge ceremony will take place tonight. Convinced that a spell was casted on her daughter, Myrnam’s parents consulted a few months ago Hougan Theo. Myrnam’s brother undertakes also the ritual. He could have been also bewitched. The girl is forced to kiss the mouth of a goat before drinking the blood flooding from the cut ear of the animal. The animal is eventually released and will not be killed. Two chickens are kept alive a few minutes standing on brother and sister crown of the heads. Soon after, brother and sister eat the stew of the two chickens. Theo wraps a big rock in a rope before burning the rope. The ritual symbolizes the hunting of the persecuting spirit. The ceremony ends up in the middle of the night. Myrnam’s parents are happy. Their daughter is cured.

Bains rituels, 2009. Photographed by http://picspics.fr.

They are named Erzulie, Cousin Zaka, Ogoun Feray. They are the lwas in Creole language, the voodoo pantheon of spirits. They are bridges between humans and the Bondye, the Supreme Being viewed as inaccessible by Voodoo believers. Every July, thousands of Haitians take good luck baths in Saut d’Eau. There, catholics give thanks to the Virgin Mary. Voodoo believers bath in a fall to worship Erzulie, the voodoo spirit of love and motherly protector. Some enter into a trance. Candles are placed between the roots of huge trees honored as resting places of the lwas. In Plaine du Nord, Northern Haiti, catholic pilgrims celebrate Saint-Jacques-The Saviour and Voodoo believers Papa Ogoun Feray, the lwa of war. Founding spirit of the revolt of the slaves, Papa Ogoun Feray is praised for its power to fight poverty. His followers take mud baths in the Pool Saint-Jacques and kill in sacrifice red roosters and black bulls. With the faith renewed, they end their pilgrimage to the seaside city of Lemonade and purify their soul and body in the Atlantic waters.

Bains rituels, 2009. Photographed by http://picspics.fr.

They are named Erzulie, Cousin Zaka, Ogoun Feray. They are the lwas in Creole language, the voodoo pantheon of spirits. They are bridges between humans and the Bondye, the Supreme Being viewed as inaccessible by Voodoo believers. Every July, thousands of Haitians take good luck baths in Saut d’Eau. There, catholics give thanks to the Virgin Mary. Voodoo believers bath in a fall to worship Erzulie, the voodoo spirit of love and motherly protector. Some enter into a trance. Candles are placed between the roots of huge trees honored as resting places of the lwas. In Plaine du Nord, Northern Haiti, catholic pilgrims celebrate Saint-Jacques-The Saviour and Voodoo believers Papa Ogoun Feray, the lwa of war. Founding spirit of the revolt of the slaves, Papa Ogoun Feray is praised for its power to fight poverty. His followers take mud baths in the Pool Saint-Jacques and kill in sacrifice red roosters and black bulls. With the faith renewed, they end their pilgrimage to the seaside city of Lemonade and purify their soul and body in the Atlantic waters.

A l’épreuve de la gouvernance, 2008-2010. Photographed by http://www.picspics.fr/.

In April 2008, a week of riots against the rising cost of life engulfed Haiti. Besides the legitimate aspirations of a population widely affected by food insecurity, some believe that supporters of former President Aristide have hijacked the movement. The HNP, the Haitian National Police appeared quickly overwhelmed. UN peacekeepers strive to limit outbursts. A week later, five dead, hundreds wounded and massive destruction of property are found. The government has no option but to resign. In May 2008, the PNH set up a crowd management drill with the support of UN peacekeepers.

Reconstruction en Haïti: un devoir d’artistes, 2010. Photographed by http://picspics.fr/

« Je suis revenu vivre dans ma maison, c’est là qu’est ma vie, je suis vivant. Mon cœur bat encore et il y a du soleil et quand il fait chaud; moi je préfère vivre là. Je ne me suis pas tellement senti à l’aise. C’est vrai parce qu’il n y a plus de mur, c’est juste un rideau maintenant, mais c’est une façon de vivre quand même.».